colinresponse:

daughtersofdig:

READ: Why Mixed with White isn’t White via Hyphen magazine - Asian American arts, culture, and politics

beautiful (and concise) piece. brevity is brilliance. a useful lens to peep for white folks, people of color who identify as monoracial, mixed heritage PoC who have two parents of color, and just as importantly (if not moreso), people of color with one white parent who have been pushed/threatened and pulled/bribed to assimilate into the dominant culture, while blindly committing varying and various degrees of suicide.
always(!) a must for us to do our best to invite critique from our family and friends of color who have less (if any) connection to dominant white society, around the ways we un/knowingly benefit (or align ourselves with those that do) at their expense. and at the same time, we must be willing and able to identify, articulate and speak to our own experiences in a society and world bent on demonizing/deifying/dehumanizing and dividing our families, communities and selves in the name of white supremacy and organized historical amnesia.      

colinresponse:

daughtersofdig:

READ: Why Mixed with White isn’t White via Hyphen magazine - Asian American arts, culture, and politics

beautiful (and concise) piece. brevity is brilliance. a useful lens to peep for white folks, people of color who identify as monoracial, mixed heritage PoC who have two parents of color, and just as importantly (if not moreso), people of color with one white parent who have been pushed/threatened and pulled/bribed to assimilate into the dominant culture, while blindly committing varying and various degrees of suicide.

always(!) a must for us to do our best to invite critique from our family and friends of color who have less (if any) connection to dominant white society, around the ways we un/knowingly benefit (or align ourselves with those that do) at their expense. and at the same time, we must be willing and able to identify, articulate and speak to our own experiences in a society and world bent on demonizing/deifying/dehumanizing and dividing our families, communities and selves in the name of white supremacy and organized historical amnesia.      

Remember Your Roots

(Darryl Mar, Tony Osumi)

1993-1994. Western Ave and 7th St.

Assistants: Sergio Torres, Moritz Lechadores. Special thanks to: The Center for Korean Youth Culture, UCLA Asian American Studies Center, SPARC, Glenn Omatsu, Cindy Chen, Claudia Cho, Kathy Cho, Anthony, Alberta Lee, William Davis, Sam Chung, and the Local Community whom this mural is for. Sponsored by the Social and Public Art Resource Center and made possible through a contract with the Cultural Affairs Department, city of Los Angeles. Neighborhood Pride Great Walls Unlimited. [x]

photo sources [1, 2, 3]

greatonemorethingtoremember:

Untitled (1967)
lucite box with collage
Ray Yoshida

greatonemorethingtoremember:

Untitled (1967)

lucite box with collage

Ray Yoshida

18mr:

You helped build Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center’s latest digital exhibition, A Day in the Life of Asian Pacific America, and the results are stunning.

18mr:

Will a little cultural competence go a long way? Due to shifting demographics, the Alhambra Police Department is the first agency in the US to use Weibo, a Chinese social media provider, in an effort to communicate and build trust with the Chinese community. -AW [Photo by Gary Friedman / Los Angeles Times]

18mr:

Will a little cultural competence go a long way? Due to shifting demographics, the Alhambra Police Department is the first agency in the US to use Weibo, a Chinese social media provider, in an effort to communicate and build trust with the Chinese community. -AW [Photo by Gary Friedman / Los Angeles Times]

sahteen:

The difference among “Laos”, “Laotian”, and “Lao” by Alif Silpachai

Yes! I cringe whenever I hear a fellow Lao American tell me that they are “Laos” or they speak “Laos.” No bruh.

asianamsmakingmusic:


from Nobuko Miyamoto’s Facebook timeline (June 30, 2014 entry):

We were singing “This Land is Your Land, this land is my land….this land belongs to you and me.” I’ve always felt that was insensitive to Native peoples, even though it wasn’t meant that way. And here I am next to Navajo singer, Radmilla Cody. I apologized to her. 


Original photo caption by Jacob Wainwright Love: Stage right during the finale, “This Land Is Your Land.” Tribute to Pete Seeger. Left to right: Luci Murphy, Nobuko Miyamoto, Radmilla Cody, Abigail Washburn (and child), Martha Gonzalez, Tony Seeger. Ngoma Stage, Smithsonian Folklife Festival. Friday, 27 June 2014, 8:03.45 p.m. — with Anthony Seeger and Martha Gonzalez.

asianamsmakingmusic:

from Nobuko Miyamoto’s Facebook timeline (June 30, 2014 entry):
We were singing “This Land is Your Land, this land is my land….this land belongs to you and me.” I’ve always felt that was insensitive to Native peoples, even though it wasn’t meant that way. And here I am next to Navajo singer, Radmilla Cody. I apologized to her.
Original photo caption by Jacob Wainwright Love: Stage right during the finale, “This Land Is Your Land.” Tribute to Pete Seeger. Left to right: Luci Murphy, Nobuko Miyamoto, Radmilla Cody, Abigail Washburn (and child), Martha Gonzalez, Tony Seeger. Ngoma Stage, Smithsonian Folklife Festival. Friday, 27 June 2014, 8:03.45 p.m. — with Anthony Seeger and Martha Gonzalez.
asianamsmakingmusic:

The H-Project: Silence No More (compilation) 
about + lyrics / mp3 song links

Katie Ka Vang is a Hmong American Performance Artist, Writer and Diaspora Rocker.
The first time my activism was intentional was in 2004 when I took part in a Hmong artist initiative called H Project. The H Project initially started as a CD to raise awareness about the Hmong Genocide in Laos. At that time I was a volunteer at Center for Hmong Arts&Talent (CHAT), a non profit arts organization in St. Paul. A group called H3 (Hmong Hlub Hmong or Hmong Loving Hmong), who sadly is no longer around, approached CHAT to be a collaborator on this project. H3 was approached by Fact Finding Commission a Human Rights investigation (FFC); with recent footage captured by underground journalists, of the Hmong people hiding in the jungles of Laos.
We did a national call for performing artists (musicians, emcees, poets) to submit pieces around this issue. Their requirement was to attend a workshop in their area or contact us to get a copy of the footage. We received over 30 submissions, which were all inspiring- at the end of the project we had a CD and a bonus CD.
We named it The H-Project: Silence No More. This project was our efforts in raising awareness about the genocide, but at the same time did more than that. The title represented a lot of the experiences we as Hmong Americans were facing in America- (it was probably also a reminder for us, to speak out about our own injustices too.); it also brought together a community of artists and challenged them to use their aesthetic as a tool for social change.
I remember us selling CDs out of our back packs at the outdoor Hmong July 4th Soccer Tournament (a huge event with over 25,000 attendees at Como Park, St. Paul), and many Hmong people wouldn’t give us the time or day, (which was very eye opening), but at the same time, there were many that would. We pushed these CDs and used them as a vehicle to talk to people about the issue; I think we each sold over 50 CDs single handedly.
That same year, CHAT dedicated its annual art festival to this issue and themed it’s festival The H Project: Silence No More. There, we had a public exhibit, of works in all genres (visual arts, performing arts, literary arts, dance); raising awareness and protesting the genocide, with about 2000 attendees.
Since then, some of the artists and participants who took part in the project have gone on to protest other injustices, such as the Chai Vang case (2005); the Hmong grave desecration in Thailand (2006); the Fong Lee case (2009); and other campaigns around the same genocide, have been birthed.
In 2007 The H Project CD went into its second production and is still being sold. [source]

asianamsmakingmusic:

The H-Project: Silence No More (compilation)

about + lyrics / mp3 song links

Katie Ka Vang is a Hmong American Performance Artist, Writer and Diaspora Rocker.

The first time my activism was intentional was in 2004 when I took part in a Hmong artist initiative called H Project. The H Project initially started as a CD to raise awareness about the Hmong Genocide in Laos. At that time I was a volunteer at Center for Hmong Arts&Talent (CHAT), a non profit arts organization in St. Paul. A group called H3 (Hmong Hlub Hmong or Hmong Loving Hmong), who sadly is no longer around, approached CHAT to be a collaborator on this project. H3 was approached by Fact Finding Commission a Human Rights investigation (FFC); with recent footage captured by underground journalists, of the Hmong people hiding in the jungles of Laos.

We did a national call for performing artists (musicians, emcees, poets) to submit pieces around this issue. Their requirement was to attend a workshop in their area or contact us to get a copy of the footage. We received over 30 submissions, which were all inspiring- at the end of the project we had a CD and a bonus CD.

We named it The H-Project: Silence No More. This project was our efforts in raising awareness about the genocide, but at the same time did more than that. The title represented a lot of the experiences we as Hmong Americans were facing in America- (it was probably also a reminder for us, to speak out about our own injustices too.); it also brought together a community of artists and challenged them to use their aesthetic as a tool for social change.

I remember us selling CDs out of our back packs at the outdoor Hmong July 4th Soccer Tournament (a huge event with over 25,000 attendees at Como Park, St. Paul), and many Hmong people wouldn’t give us the time or day, (which was very eye opening), but at the same time, there were many that would. We pushed these CDs and used them as a vehicle to talk to people about the issue; I think we each sold over 50 CDs single handedly.

That same year, CHAT dedicated its annual art festival to this issue and themed it’s festival The H Project: Silence No More. There, we had a public exhibit, of works in all genres (visual arts, performing arts, literary arts, dance); raising awareness and protesting the genocide, with about 2000 attendees.

Since then, some of the artists and participants who took part in the project have gone on to protest other injustices, such as the Chai Vang case (2005); the Hmong grave desecration in Thailand (2006); the Fong Lee case (2009); and other campaigns around the same genocide, have been birthed.

In 2007 The H Project CD went into its second production and is still being sold. [source]