18mr:

Reappropriate breaks down the clusterfuck of an interview that happened between Jon Stewart and Bill O’Reilly:

The problem is, quite simply, that privilege and income are not synonymous terms. Oprah can give away cars on her show and still be racially profiled in a retail store. Meanwhile,Whites (and Asians) can still grow up in households that earn thousands of dollars less than affluent Blacks and Latinos in California and still have better access to higher quality schools than their wealthy underrepresented minority peers. Even the most impoverished White family still enjoys the benefits of skin privilege, which includes not just the privilege of not being Stopped-and-Frisked (or shot to death) under the assumption of colour-coded criminality, but also the greater likelihood of being born in traditionally White enclaves (like O’Reilly’s Levittown) that enjoy greater access to educational capital and government investment.

And, while O’Reilly is correct that no one is forced to live in ethnic enclaves anymore, O’Reilly fails to account for the latent cultural factors that continue to limit entry into traditionally homogenous neighbourhoods. Non-White families that attempt to integrate a predominantly White enclave like Levittown must build the resources to move, find local employment opportunities, and oftentimes defy local resistance to their entry; ironically,the first African American family to attempt integration into another Levittown found themselves at the epicenter of a riot. Thus, not suprisingly, only 11% of Americans move, and just under half for housing-related reasons such as entry into a better home or neighbourhood. O’Reilly’s hometown of Levittown, half a century after the end of overt racial segregation, remains 95% White. That is the cultural residue of redlining.

Meanwhile, Bill O’Reilly’s stubborn refusal to acknowledge his own skin privilege would be far less obnoxious if he would stop using Asian Americans as his model minority cudgelwith which to chastise other groups, and Jon Stewart’s sputtering would’ve been far less obnoxious if he had thought to invite an AAPI and a few other people of colour to contribute to the debate over the minority experience.

Instead, two White men got on camera last night to spend a quarter of an hour to tell us all about racism. But this is America, where White privilege doesn’t exist, right?

reconcilingworks:

We are proud to honor Tseng Kwong Chi as our Spirit Month’s icon today!
Tseng Kwong Chi, also known as Joseph Tseng, was the preeminent photographer of the 1980s New York pop scene. His work engages a wide variety of traditions, from landscape photography to portraiture. His best-known photographs examine perceptions of “foreign-ness,” as he experimented artistically with his Asian-American identity.
Tseng immigrated as a teen with his family to Canada. After studying Fine Arts in Paris, he moved to New York City. Tseng compiled portraits of the period’s most celebrated artists. He produced the largest Keith Haring archive, taking more than 40,000 photographs of the renowned graffiti artist and his drawings and murals.
Tseng’s most famous body of work is his collection of self-portraits, titled “Expeditionary Self-Portrait Series” or alternatively “East Meets West.” In the series, Tseng adopted the identity of a stereotypical Chinese dignitary, donning a Mao suit, mirrored sunglasses and an ID badge that read “SlutforArt.” He situated himself in front of well-known Western monuments and tourist sites, including the World Trade Center, the Eiffel Tower and Mount Rushmore.
Tseng’s photographs exploit the juxtaposition of perceived and self-assigned identities. Reductive stereotypes were particularly relevant for LGBT Americans of his generation.
At age 39, Tseng died of AIDS-related illness. The stunning portfolio he amassed in his brief career secured his legacy as one of the best photographers of his era. His work has been displayed in museums worldwide, including the Guggenheim and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art.

reconcilingworks:

We are proud to honor Tseng Kwong Chi as our Spirit Month’s icon today!

Tseng Kwong Chi, also known as Joseph Tseng, was the preeminent photographer of the 1980s New York pop scene. His work engages a wide variety of traditions, from landscape photography to portraiture. His best-known photographs examine perceptions of “foreign-ness,” as he experimented artistically with his Asian-American identity.

Tseng immigrated as a teen with his family to Canada. After studying Fine Arts in Paris, he moved to New York City. Tseng compiled portraits of the period’s most celebrated artists. He produced the largest Keith Haring archive, taking more than 40,000 photographs of the renowned graffiti artist and his drawings and murals.

Tseng’s most famous body of work is his collection of self-portraits, titled “Expeditionary Self-Portrait Series” or alternatively “East Meets West.” In the series, Tseng adopted the identity of a stereotypical Chinese dignitary, donning a Mao suit, mirrored sunglasses and an ID badge that read “SlutforArt.” He situated himself in front of well-known Western monuments and tourist sites, including the World Trade Center, the Eiffel Tower and Mount Rushmore.

Tseng’s photographs exploit the juxtaposition of perceived and self-assigned identities. Reductive stereotypes were particularly relevant for LGBT Americans of his generation.

At age 39, Tseng died of AIDS-related illness. The stunning portfolio he amassed in his brief career secured his legacy as one of the best photographers of his era. His work has been displayed in museums worldwide, including the Guggenheim and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art.

pag-asaharibon:

The Philippine Star literature and culture columnist Alfred A. Yuson piece  A century of migration, and Carlos Bulosan noted the Library of Congress 2006 symposium on him titled “America Is in The Heart for The 21st Century” Thomas Jefferson Building, in Washington, D.C.
White House Initiative on Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders  announced that the theme for the 2013 celebration of Asian American & Pacific Islander Heritage Month in May after his poem “I Want the Wide American Earth”. It was also the name for Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center 2013 exhibition.
Interesting since Bulosan’s activities got him blacklisted in the last 10-12 years of his life.
A Carlos Bulosan Partial Bibliography (links from March 2006 Our Own Voice Literary eZine for Filipinos in the Diaspora Bulosan Issue)

The papers to be read by notable Bulosan scholars are the following:
“Blueprint for a Bulosan Project: Prospects for Renewing the Filipino Critical Imagination" by Dr. E. San Juan, Jr., Philippine Cultural Studies Center, Storrs, CT.
"The Third Oriental Invasion: Filipino Immigrants as “Race Problem” in the Early Twentieth Century American West" by Dr. Rick A. Baldoz, visiting fellow, Stanford University Center for the Comparative Study of Race and Ethnicity.
“Carlos Bulosan, the Postcolonial Poet" by Dr. Susan Evangelista, Palawan State University.
“Some Notes for Reconsidering Carlos Bulosan’s “Third World Literary Radicalism” by Jeffrey Arellano Cabusao, University of Michigan.
“Carlos Bulosan’s Songs of Innocence and Experience: From Utopian Americanism and Internationalism to Filipino Nationalist Politics and Culture" by Dr. Tim Libretti, Northeastern Illinois University.
"Are We There Yet?” Mapping Carlos Bulosan’s America Is In The Heart” by Dr. Jorshinelle Taleon-Sonza, Rutgers University.
"Carlos Bulosan: The Filipino Working Class Legacy as Reflected in the Alaska Cannery Workers” Experiences" by Cindy Domingo, co-founder, the Carlos Bulosan Historical Project in Seattle.
“Bulosan’s Laughter: The Making of Carlos Bulosan" by Dr. Lane Hirabayashi, University of California-Riverside, and Marilyn Alquizola, San Francisco State University.
Carlene S. Bonnivier serves as moderator, while writer-composer Rod Garcia performs ‘songs in Exile: A Musical Tribute.”Video footage will also be screened: Scenes from The Romance of Magno Rubio as adapted for the stage by Lonnie Carter, courtesy of Ma-Yi Theater New York. It comes to a close with a PowerPoint presentation by Reme-Antonia Grefalda, titled “Healing by Recollecting.”Going by a quick browse of some of the symposium papers currently featured in the special Bulosan issue of Our Own Voice. I was particularly impressed by Epifanio San Juan’s and Susan Evangelista’s papers. Too bad we”re running out of space to share larger excerpts here. But here’s from San Juan, who may rightfully claim to have started the Bulosan adulation trend by authoring, in 1972, the UP Press book Carlos Bulosan and the Imagination of the Class Struggle, and subsequently editing the first anthology of Bulosan’s writings as a special May 1979 issue of Amerasia Journal.In his symposium paper he warns:"Because Bulosan is now required reading for thousands of college students and an icon for local folks, he is in danger of becoming an allergy or aversion. We may cite here places or sites honoring his memory and example: the Carlos Bulosan Memorial Exhibit in Seattle’s International District; the Carlos Bulosan Theater in Toronto, Canada, a community-based professional theater company run by Filipino Canadians; a rumored plan of the National Press Club in Manila to set up a Carlos Bulosan Foundation Prize; and a Carlos Bulosan Heritage Center recently inaugurated in New York City. Is there a Bulosan Pizza Parlor or Bulosan Shopping Mall around the corner? Like Rizal, Bulosan is in danger of becoming inutile, trivialized, taken for granted and museumified as a literary “high priest,” or monumental anito (ancestor).”For her part, Evangelista contextualizes Bulosan as poet:"Bulosan liked to think of himself first as a poet, even though most of his readers are more familiar with his fiction. (H)e did seem to have a poet’s sensibility he was extremely emotional and had a very vivid, highly sensuous imagination; he loved the details of sight and sound and feeling, whether he was idealizing the more pastoral aspects of his homeland or struggling with the wide, alienating landscapes of the US."Note, for example, the sensuousness of "My Father was a Working Man": “My father was a working man/ In the land of the big rains,/ The water glistened on his arms/ Like the cool dew in the morning/ When the rice was growing tall: / The rich clay clung on his legs, / Dark brown clay of great fertility, / Dark brown like his body in the rain.” …"His sensitivity to visual imagery gives us industrial images that are just as startling and vivid as his natural images: “I saw sunlight mount intricate / Webs of steel and stone/ Will you/ Remember the bewildering upward thrust of buildings, / The amazing conflagrations of stabbing lights?” “He also has a very unique way of inserting his own physical being into a much broader context: “I find it hard to walk in the night./ But I watch history rush through the heart of America, / From one ocean to meadow to another ocean, feeling / The voluminous downpour of blood from the lung, / The sudden snapping of red wires upon my side.”  “But he also commented that it was his poetry that offered the clearest, most complete form of his political thought and he was a highly political being. For some of us the union between poetry and politics is a bit problematic, since poetry seems by its very nature to be personal and concrete, and a poem that ends with an abstract political generalization of some sort thus strikes a false note. “Bulosan managed to bridge this gap successfully most of the time, despite the occasional “false note”.” For the rest of these wonderful papers, you may log on to www.oovrag.com. Like me, you’ll thank Sonny San Juan for managing to procure and preserve Carlos Bulosan’s library card for the L.A. Public Library. Mabuhay si Bulosan! Indeed, as Grefalda pays tribute: “The man was a writer. He wrote about a Dream. Dipped this dream in blood and scars. Made it reachable. Gave it structure, the stuff of searing soul. What he wrote about captured the spirit of Asian peoples migrating from their homeland. For the migrant is Everyman. He unleashed a vision so that his voice rang clear beyond his own time, and will peal like bells or toll a dirge throughout centuries.”

pag-asaharibon:

The Philippine Star literature and culture columnist Alfred A. Yuson piece  A century of migration, and Carlos Bulosan noted the Library of Congress 2006 symposium on him titled “America Is in The Heart for The 21st Century” Thomas Jefferson Building, in Washington, D.C.

White House Initiative on Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders  announced that the theme for the 2013 celebration of Asian American & Pacific Islander Heritage Month in May after his poem “I Want the Wide American Earth”. It was also the name for Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center 2013 exhibition.

Interesting since Bulosan’s activities got him blacklisted in the last 10-12 years of his life.

A Carlos Bulosan Partial Bibliography (links from March 2006 Our Own Voice Literary eZine for Filipinos in the Diaspora Bulosan Issue)

The papers to be read by notable Bulosan scholars are the following:

Carlene S. Bonnivier serves as moderator, while writer-composer Rod Garcia performs ‘songs in Exile: A Musical Tribute.”

Video footage will also be screened: Scenes from The Romance of Magno Rubio as adapted for the stage by Lonnie Carter, courtesy of Ma-Yi Theater New York. It comes to a close with a PowerPoint presentation by Reme-Antonia Grefalda, titled “Healing by Recollecting.”

Going by a quick browse of some of the symposium papers currently featured in the special Bulosan issue of Our Own Voice. 

I was particularly impressed by Epifanio San Juan’s and Susan Evangelista’s papers. Too bad we”re running out of space to share larger excerpts here. But here’s from San Juan, who may rightfully claim to have started the Bulosan adulation trend by authoring, in 1972, the UP Press book Carlos Bulosan and the Imagination of the Class Struggle, and subsequently editing the first anthology of Bulosan’s writings as a special May 1979 issue of Amerasia Journal.

In his symposium paper he warns:

"Because Bulosan is now required reading for thousands of college students and an icon for local folks, he is in danger of becoming an allergy or aversion. We may cite here places or sites honoring his memory and example: the Carlos Bulosan Memorial Exhibit in Seattle’s International District; the Carlos Bulosan Theater in Toronto, Canada, a community-based professional theater company run by Filipino Canadians; a rumored plan of the National Press Club in Manila to set up a Carlos Bulosan Foundation Prize; and a Carlos Bulosan Heritage Center recently inaugurated in New York City. Is there a Bulosan Pizza Parlor or Bulosan Shopping Mall around the corner? Like Rizal, Bulosan is in danger of becoming inutile, trivialized, taken for granted and museumified as a literary “high priest,” or monumental anito (ancestor).”

For her part, Evangelista contextualizes Bulosan as poet:

"Bulosan liked to think of himself first as a poet, even though most of his readers are more familiar with his fiction. (H)e did seem to have a poet’s sensibility he was extremely emotional and had a very vivid, highly sensuous imagination; he loved the details of sight and sound and feeling, whether he was idealizing the more pastoral aspects of his homeland or struggling with the wide, alienating landscapes of the US.

"Note, for example, the sensuousness of "My Father was a Working Man": “My father was a working man/ In the land of the big rains,/ The water glistened on his arms/ Like the cool dew in the morning/ When the rice was growing tall: / The rich clay clung on his legs, / Dark brown clay of great fertility, / Dark brown like his body in the rain.” …

"His sensitivity to visual imagery gives us industrial images that are just as startling and vivid as his natural images: “I saw sunlight mount intricate / Webs of steel and stone/ Will you/ Remember the bewildering upward thrust of buildings, / The amazing conflagrations of stabbing lights?”

“He also has a very unique way of inserting his own physical being into a much broader context: “I find it hard to walk in the night./ But I watch history rush through the heart of America, / From one ocean to meadow to another ocean, feeling / The voluminous downpour of blood from the lung, / The sudden snapping of red wires upon my side.”

“But he also commented that it was his poetry that offered the clearest, most complete form of his political thought and he was a highly political being. For some of us the union between poetry and politics is a bit problematic, since poetry seems by its very nature to be personal and concrete, and a poem that ends with an abstract political generalization of some sort thus strikes a false note.

“Bulosan managed to bridge this gap successfully most of the time, despite the occasional “false note”.”

For the rest of these wonderful papers, you may log on to www.oovrag.com. Like me, you’ll thank Sonny San Juan for managing to procure and preserve Carlos Bulosan’s library card for the L.A. Public Library.

Mabuhay si Bulosan!
 Indeed, as Grefalda pays tribute: “The man was a writer. He wrote about a Dream. Dipped this dream in blood and scars. Made it reachable. Gave it structure, the stuff of searing soul. What he wrote about captured the spirit of Asian peoples migrating from their homeland. For the migrant is Everyman. He unleashed a vision so that his voice rang clear beyond his own time, and will peal like bells or toll a dirge throughout centuries.”

18mr:

We’re headed to #FergusonOctober. But we’re not going empty-handed.If you wanted to head to Ferguson this weekend, but couldn’t swing the trip, help us help the coalition by chipping in for supplies. Brought by the Asian American contingent, shared with the movement.Make your pledge here.

18mr:

We’re headed to #FergusonOctober. But we’re not going empty-handed.

If you wanted to head to Ferguson this weekend, but couldn’t swing the trip, help us help the coalition by chipping in for supplies. Brought by the Asian American contingent, shared with the movement.

Make your pledge here.

fyeahapihistory:

Indian students in front of International House at the University of Chicago in June 1946. Since their visas did not permit them to reenter the U.S. once they left, some chose to forgo the opportunity to return home, and eventually became the very first Indian immigrants of the modern era. (Courtesy of C.K. Chandran.)
After World War II, students and academics arrived in small numbers. Most were on Indian government scholarships and were required to return upon completion of their studies. In the early 1960s, short-term visitors to the U.S. included some 45 Indian engineers who were brought to Inland Steel and U.S. Steel for training in running newly constructed steel mills in India. The selective nature of the 1965 immigration law gave initial preference to skilled professionals but once established, these professionals sponosred their relatives and the community became much more diverse.

fyeahapihistory:

Indian students in front of International House at the University of Chicago in June 1946. Since their visas did not permit them to reenter the U.S. once they left, some chose to forgo the opportunity to return home, and eventually became the very first Indian immigrants of the modern era. (Courtesy of C.K. Chandran.)

After World War II, students and academics arrived in small numbers. Most were on Indian government scholarships and were required to return upon completion of their studies. In the early 1960s, short-term visitors to the U.S. included some 45 Indian engineers who were brought to Inland Steel and U.S. Steel for training in running newly constructed steel mills in India. The selective nature of the 1965 immigration law gave initial preference to skilled professionals but once established, these professionals sponosred their relatives and the community became much more diverse.