papershopprojects:

The University of Hawai’i Press will be having a 67% off sale from September 5 (6am) to September 8 (6am), Hawai’i Standard Time!
They have a small selection of Okinawa/Ryukyu-related books including the Okinawan-English Wordbook (Mitsugu Sakihara), Okinawan Diaspora (edited by Ronald Nakasone), and Voices from Okinawa: Featuring Three Plays by Jon Shirota.

papershopprojects:

The University of Hawai’i Press will be having a 67% off sale from September 5 (6am) to September 8 (6am), Hawai’i Standard Time!

They have a small selection of Okinawa/Ryukyu-related books including the Okinawan-English Wordbook (Mitsugu Sakihara), Okinawan Diaspora (edited by Ronald Nakasone), and Voices from Okinawa: Featuring Three Plays by Jon Shirota.

likechipanddale:

disciplesofmalcolm:

“You will love the things that destroy you, and you will hate the things that advance your growth. Look at your behavior. Look at the behavior of your compatriots and watch if what I’m saying is not true.
'I hate to read. I hate to study. I hate to learn. Oh, but I love to party. I love to smoke. I like to drink. I love to screw.' And all the loves you will find will be loves that what? That don’t advance you one bit, and yet you can’t get over them. You’re addicted to them.
But things that lead to growth, to growth and wisdom, knowledge, you see, self-understanding and self-discovery, healthy relations, self-control; all those things are hateful.
But this is the only way a minority can rule over a majority of people, is by turning their minds backwards. So that they love the things that destroy them and hate the things that move them forward. In order for these people to rule over us, we must hate learning. This has to be built into us.
If we were into learning, if we were into research, and into thinking, and into real philosophical ideas and abstraction, we would defeat those people. They know it. So consequently, what they must do is rob you of all of these things so that they may stay in their place.”
-Dr. Amos N. Wilson

The last paragraph! The reason why I want to further myself in academia. Hell yes! 

likechipanddale:

disciplesofmalcolm:

“You will love the things that destroy you, and you will hate the things that advance your growth. Look at your behavior. Look at the behavior of your compatriots and watch if what I’m saying is not true.

'I hate to read. I hate to study. I hate to learn. Oh, but I love to party. I love to smoke. I like to drink. I love to screw.' And all the loves you will find will be loves that what? That don’t advance you one bit, and yet you can’t get over them. You’re addicted to them.

But things that lead to growth, to growth and wisdom, knowledge, you see, self-understanding and self-discovery, healthy relations, self-control; all those things are hateful.

But this is the only way a minority can rule over a majority of people, is by turning their minds backwards. So that they love the things that destroy them and hate the things that move them forward. In order for these people to rule over us, we must hate learning. This has to be built into us.

If we were into learning, if we were into research, and into thinking, and into real philosophical ideas and abstraction, we would defeat those people. They know it. So consequently, what they must do is rob you of all of these things so that they may stay in their place.”

-Dr. Amos N. Wilson

The last paragraph! The reason why I want to further myself in academia. Hell yes! 

(Source: youtube.com)

“In the fall of 1998, Jonathan Okamura and I began co-editing a special issue of UCLA’s Amerasia Journal. We started with a critical framework of race relations in Hawai‘i, and it was not until Native Hawaiian nationalist and scholar Haunani-Kay Trask sent us her essay, ‘‘Settlers of Color and ‘Immigrant’ Hegemony: ‘Locals’ in Hawai‘i,’’ that we could identify the settler assumptions behind our conceptualization of our project. Trask’s insightful and powerful arguments showed us that our focus on race relations was precisely the problem. While our work sought to map out a system of racism among peoples of color in ethnically stratified Hawai‘i, we were using a race-based civil rights framework that was ill-equipped for analyzing a colonial situation. In effect, we were leveling the differences between Natives and non-Native peoples of color, reducing indigenous peoples to racial minorities. In our desire to locate shared critiques of racism that would provide a basis for solidarity and alliances between Natives and non-Natives, our project failed to consider the fact that in the colony of Hawai‘i, ‘‘local’’ Asians are settlers who are part of the colonial problem.”
Candace Fujikane, “Foregrounding Native Nationalisms: A Critique of Antinationalist Sentiment in Asian American Studies,” in Kent A. Ono, ed.,
Asian American Studies After Critical Mass, pg. 74.
seanmiura:

Hello.

seanmiura:

Hello.

aaww-nyc:

Novelist Wena Poon searches for the Asian American soul of a very white town through her camera lens…

New on Open City

red-lipstick:

Drawn-Beyond-Reality aka Maria Nguyen aka Duong Thuy Nguyen (based Mississauga, Ontario, Canada) - Amongst Friends aka Camouflage, 2014     Drawings

red-lipstick:

Drawn-Beyond-Reality aka Maria Nguyen aka Duong Thuy Nguyen (based Mississauga, Ontario, Canada) - Amongst Friends aka Camouflage, 2014     Drawings

(Source: drawn-beyond-reality.deviantart.com)

silvermoon424:

(source for quote)

This has to be the one time a creator has been wrong about their own work. Hello Kitty is a cat. She is a cat. Little girls don’t have cat ears and cat noses and cat whiskers and cat paws, even in cartoons. 

She is a cat.

also from the above linked L.A. Times article:

Hello Kitty has special significance to Asian Americans.

Yes, she’s worldwide. But Hello Kitty has had special resonance with Asians who grew up in the United States.

"When Hello Kitty arrived in the U.S. in the mid-1970s, it was a commodity mainly in Asian enclaves: Chinatowns, Japantowns, etc.," explains Yano. "In talking to Japanese Americans who grew up in the 1970s, they say, ‘That figure means so much to us because she was ours.’ It’s something they saw as an identity marker. This is why the exhibition is being held at the Japanese American National Museum. It’s about reconnecting her to this community. It gives the whole thing a certain poignancy and power."

il-tenore-regina:

wocinsolidarity:

homoarigato:

That’s What She SaidA queer, Asian-American web series following the lives of 5 friends in Los Angeles. Created out of a desire to see positive Asian representations in the media, as well as to give voice to the often untold stories of queer Asian women, the series chronicles the lives of five fictional characters – Leslie, Rae, Shin, Baby, and Nic – within the queer sphere of the greater Los Angeles area.

SIGNAL BOOST

FINALLY A NEW WEBSERIES TO WATCH YESSSSSSS! 

(Source: queerthanks)

Bill O’Reilly, Asians Americans Choose Resistance.

18mr:

image

Who caught Bill O’Reilly’s recent “rebuttal" of white privilege yesterday? Consider it a case study in how the model minority myth serves to derail conversations about the realities of white supremacy and anti-blackness in America today.

It’s a textbook execution, Bill. But we’re not buying it. We choose resistance.

For more, read Scot Nakagawa’s ever pertinent “The Model Minority is a Lever of White Supremacy”: http://
bit.ly/1piOFKk

-MTP

bad-doing:

i found these two photographs, taken from a 1982 strike organized by the International Ladies Garment Workers Union (IGLWU) Local 23-25 in chinatown.

as dopey as it is, there’s something powerful about seeing women whose stories are so alike the stories of my mother and my aunts — these images are on the shortlist for my favorites ever.

found at:
Labor Arts
Amerasia Journal, 35(1), 2009

characters on the signs read:
讓我們站在一起
"Let us stand together."

bjanepr:

Pinay Lit at USF Syllabus Item: Have you read Yay (Panlilio) Marking? I think she might be the first Pinay in the USA with a full length book published (in the USA). Here is an old write-up from when I taught Pinay Lit in 2012.

bjanepr:

Pinay Lit at USF Syllabus Item: Have you read Yay (Panlilio) Marking? I think she might be the first Pinay in the USA with a full length book published (in the USA). Here is an old write-up from when I taught Pinay Lit in 2012.